Expedited Removal – Not see Judge

July 22, 2019 – The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced on that it would vastly expand “expedited removal,” a provision of the law that permits the agency to rapidly deport certain individuals without an opportunity to see an immigration judge. Under the expansion, DHS can rapidly deport undocumented immigrants in the United States who crossed the border without a visa and have not resided in the United States for at least two years. This amounts to a nationwide “send them back” immigration policy.

Individuals who are subject to expedited removal don’t get a chance to go in front of an immigration judge to argue against their deportation. Instead, the decision about whether some can and should be deported under expedited removal is made by a single immigration enforcement officer, with the only review coming from the officer’s supervisor. Courts are generally prohibited from reviewing a deportation order done through expedited removal (except in very narrow circumstances) and only asylum seekers have a path to avoid expedited removal.

Previously, expedited removal applied only to those encountered within 100 miles of the border and within 14 days of entering the United States. Customs and Border Protection officers were the ones making decisions about whether people qualified for expedited removal. However, under the expansion, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) also would be able to carry out expedited removal determinations inside the United States.

As a result of this new expansion, ICE officers also would act as both judge and jury. A single officer and supervisor could determine whether individuals with significant ties to the United States should go through expedited removal and be deported without judicial review.

The new policy goes into effect on Tuesday, July 23. An estimated 300,000 people in the United States could now be at risk of arrest and deportation without the opportunity to see a judge. That doesn’t even consider people who may be erroneously placed in expedited removal proceedings. Individuals will have the burden of proving to ICE they have resided in the United States for two or more years.

Because expedited removal generally does not involve the safeguard of judicial review, legal immigrants and even U.S. citizens will be at much greater risk of wrongful deportation. Because ICE is casting its net wider, it’s more likely than ever that citizens will face arrests. And with expanded expedited removal taking away judicial review in some cases, the odds that a mistaken arrest could lead to a wrongful deportation will be even higher.

Congress created expedited removal in 1996 as a way to speed up the deportation process. Although Congress permitted the government to apply expedited removal to anyone in the United States within two years of entry, it did not require that. Expedited removal was first applied to individuals who came through ports of entry, then in 2002 it was expanded to people intercepted at sea or who arrive by boat. In 2004, the Bush administration expanded expedited removal to its current extent.

Under the current system, those who arrive at the border are generally subject to expedited removal. This permits the government to deport them without due process. But if a person expresses a fear of returning to their home country or asks for asylum, they are then referred to an asylum officer. If the asylum officer determines that a person has a credible fear of persecution, they are taken out of the expedited removal process and allowed to apply for asylum in immigration court. If the officer determines otherwise, the person is subject to rapid deportation.

Now, individuals throughout the United States could be put through this process. No one should get ripped from their home without the chance to go in front of a judge and argue why they should be allowed to stay.

The American Immigration Council and the ACLU already announced that they will sue to stop the expansion.

For more information on expedited removal, 

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Copyright © 2019, Law Offices of Gail S. Seeram. All Rights Reserved.

Express Deportation Under Trump

According to the Miami Herald, federal prosecutors in criminal cases are asking district judges to issue what are known as “judicial orders of removal,” which ensure that a convicted foreign national will be deported on completion of the sentence instead of being sent to an immigrant detention center to await proceedings in immigration court and then a deportation order from an immigration judge. The new “express” deportation under Trump, implements the Attorney General’s April 11, 2017, memorandum expressing a “renewed commitment to criminal immigration enforcement,” is purported to shorten the wait time for deportation, bypass backlogs in immigration court, and save the federal government money in housing and food in immigrant detention centers. 

The usual legal process for foreign nationals convicted of a crime in federal court was a transfer to immigration authorities upon completion of their prison terms for initiation of deportation proceedings in immigration court.  Trump administration officials hope the judicial orders of removal lead to an assembly line of deportations straight from the federal penitentiary and back to the countries from where the foreigners came — a sort of “express deportation” under Trump that skips the legal process in immigration court.  Several have already been issued in Miami federal court since Trump took office in January in cases involving sentencing of foreign nationals in felony cases. (more…)

Deportation Lawyer Offers Tip to Avoid Removal

President Barack Obama was the champion of deportation as he deported or removed the most legal and illegal immigrants than any other President before him. A total 2.4 million were deported under the Obama administration from fiscal 2009 to 2014, including a record 435,000 in 2013, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of the data. However, President Trump has promised mass deportation under his presidency and deportation lawyer Gail Seeram can help you avoid removal from the U.S.

For fiscal year 2015, ICE apprehended 406,595 individuals nationwide and conducted a total of 462,463 removals (compared to year 414,481 in 2014). U.S. Border Patrol reported 337,117 apprehensions nationwide in 2015, compared to 486,651 in FY 2014.

Deportation lawyer Gail Seeram recommends (more…)

Orlando Immigration Court

Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram has been representing immigrants in the Orlando Immigration Court since 2004 and practicing law since 1999.  The Orlando Immigration Court is located at 3535 Lawton Road, Orlando, FL 32803.  The telephone number for the Orlando Immigration Court is 407-722-8900.  Currently, the Orlando Immigration Court has seven (7) immigration judges.  If you have received a notice of hearing with a date and time (more…)

Deportation Protection By Obama Force State Lawsuits

Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram fights deportation cases for her clients and is supportive of President Obama’s executive action granting deportation protection to nearly 4 million undocumented immigrants.  Last November, President Obama issued an executive order to give deportation protection to immigrants who enter under age 16, immigrant parents of U.S. citizens, expanded who can apply for the provisional waiver for unlawful presence and increased employment and investment opportunities for immigrants.  A federal lawsuit was filed (more…)

Deportation Fears – Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram Can Help

Immigration lawyer Gail Seeram explains the newly released data of 438,421 deportations carried out from the United States during October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014 represent families suffering from separation, lower socioeconomic status, emotional stress, and limited health and educational opportunities.  Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram has noticed that more of the immigrants that consult with her have a deep fear of deportation even though they have lived in the U.S. for more than 10, 20 and sometimes 30 years.  The political climate in the U.S. of zero tolerance for illegal immigrants has cast a fear on many law abiding immigrants and their families.

(more…)

Orlando Immigration Lawyer explains Removal Proceedings

Orlando Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram explains that removal proceedings (or “deportation”) can be initiated against a lawful permanent resident or undocumented noncitizen (collectively referred to as “noncitizens”) at any time. Removal & deportation proceedings can be initiated when a noncitizen (including a lawful permanent resident) is seeking admission to the United States, filing an application for an immigration benefit (such as U.S. Citizenship or renewing/replacing a “green card”), serving a sentence for a criminal conviction (such as probation, community service or prison), or detained by local police for a criminal matter. (more…)

Prosecutorial Discretion – Ask an Immigration Lawyer

Prosecutorial discretion is a discretionary relief where Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE), the agency that initiates and executes removal/deportation from the United States, can choose to temporarily pause removal/deportation or release an individual from detention based on certain factors.  A request for prosecutorial discretion is best prepared and presented to ICE by an immigration lawyer.

In exercising prosecutorial discretion, Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) may administratively close a pending removal case (removal proceedings delayed), grant voluntary departure, grant deferred action (defer a pending removal), reissue or cancel a Notice to Appear, or release a detained individual on bond or an order of supervision. Note, in exercising prosecutorial discretion, it is unlikely that a pending removal case would be terminated unless there are extenuating factors present. In order to request prosecutorial discretion in a pending removal case or detention case, an immigration lawyer would submit the request to Immigration Custom and Enforcement (ICE).

For more information, email Gail@GailLaw.com or call 1-877-GAIL-LAW or 407-292-7730.
FREE in-office consultation – FREE Live Chat www.GailLaw.com

Copyright © 2014, Law Offices of Gail S. Seeram. All Rights Reserved.

Prosecutorial Discretion in Removal – Deportation – Ask an Immigration Lawyer

Prosecutorial discretion is a discretionary relief where Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE), the agency that initiates and executes removal/deportation from the United States, can choose to temporarily pause removal/deportation or release an individual from detention based on certain factors.

In exercising prosecutorial discretion, Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) may administratively close a pending removal case (removal proceedings delayed), grant voluntary departure, grant deferred action (defer a pending removal), reissue or cancel a Notice to Appear, or release a detained individual on bond or an order of supervision. Note, in exercising prosecutorial discretion, it is unlikely that a pending removal case would be terminated unless there are extenuating factors present. In order to request prosecutorial discretion in a pending removal case or detention case, an immigration lawyer would submit the request to Immigration Custom and Enforcement (ICE).

However, in cases where the immigrant has a criminal history these types of cases are deemed enforcement priorities and prosecutorial discretion will not be exercised in these types of cases. ICE will consider the following factors in deciding whether to grant or exercise prosecutorial discretion:

  1. the person’s length of presence in the United States, with particular consideration given to presence while in lawful status;
  2. the circumstances of the person’s arrival in the United States and the manner of his or her entry, particularly if the alien came to the United States as a young child;
  3. the person’s pursuit of education in the United States, with particular consideration given to those who have graduated from a U.S. high school or have successfully pursued or are pursuing a college or advanced degrees at a legitimate institution of higher education in the United States;
  4. whether the person, or the person’s immediate relative, has served in the U.S. military, reserves, or national guard, with particular consideration given to those who served in combat;
  5. the person’s criminal history, including arrests, prior convictions, or outstanding arrest warrants;
  6. the person’s immigration history, including any prior removal, outstanding order of removal, prior denial of status, or evidence of fraud;
  7. whether the person poses a national security or public safety concern;
  8. the person’s ties and contributions to the community, including family relationships;
  9. the person’s ties to the home country and condition in the country;
  10. the person’s age, with particular consideration given to minors and the elderly;
  11. whether the person has a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent;
  12. whether the person is the primary caretaker of a person with a mental or physical disability, minor, or seriously ill relative; ;
  13. whether the person or the person’s spouse is pregnant or nursing;
  14. whether the person or the person’s spouse suffers from severe mental or physical illness;
  15. whether the person is likely to be granted temporary or permanent status or other relief from removal, including as an asylum seeker, or a victim of domestic violence, human trafficking, or other crime; .and .
  16. whether the person is currently cooperating or has cooperated with federal, state or local law enforcement authorities, such as ICE, the U.S Attorneys or Department of Justice, the Department of Labor, or National Labor Relations Board, among others.

A formal written request for prosecutorial discretion must be submitted to the Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) office with jurisdiction over the pending case. The request must also contain supporting evidence of the above favorable factors. A request for prosecutorial discretion is best prepared and presented to ICE by an immigration lawyer. In most cases, a follow-up phone conversation is needed between the immigration lawyer submitting the request and the ICE official making the decision on whether to grant prosecutorial discretion.  Our office has been very successful in obtaining prosecutorial discretion on behalf of our clients in removal proceedings.  Contact our office for a free initial in-office consultation.

Copyright © 2014, Law Offices of Gail S. Seeram. All Rights Reserved.