Immigration Services

We offer legal representation and perform immigration services in the following areas:

Family Based “Green Cards”

Marriage Cases – Adjustment of Status in U.S.
U.S. Citizen filing for Parent, Child, Spouse or Sibling
Permanent Resident filing for Spouse or Unmarried Child(ren)
Consular Processing Abroad
Adoption/Orphans
Removal of conditional residency (jointly or seeking waiver)
Fiancé Visas (K-1, K-3)
Visa for spouses/minors of green card holders (V-1/V-2)
Abused spouses & children – VAWA Battered Spouse Petitions
Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) and “Aging Out” Cases
Advance Parole/Reentry Permits
Work Authorization
Extension & Change of Status

Employment Based “Green Cards”

EB-1: Foreign Nationals of Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Professors and Researchers and Multinational Executives and Managers
EB-2: Workers with Advanced Degrees or Exceptional Ability in the Sciences, Arts or Business
Schedule A workers
National Interest Waivers
EB-3: Skilled Workers and Professionals
EB-4: Special Immigrant Visas for Religious Workers
EB-5: Investor/Employment Creation Visas

Deportation/Removal

Voluntary Departure
Bond Hearings
Assist to Enroll in Alternatives to Detention Programs
Attorney Representation in Master Hearings
Attorney Representation in Individual Hearing
Prepare & File Waivers (212(c), 212(h), 212(i))
Prepare & File Cancellation of Removal
Motion for Prosecutorial Discretion – Administrative Closure
Consultations at Detention Facility
Motions to Reopen
Motions to Change Venue
Asylum/Refugee

Waivers – Reentry into U.S. & Adjust in U.S.

Provisional Waiver (I-601A)
Military Family – Parole in Place Waiver
Waiver for Fraud/Misrepresentation
Waiver for Crime Involving Moral Turpitude
Waiver seeking re-entry after past removal/deportation

Temporary Visas

B-1/B-2: Visitor Visas
E-1/E-2: Treaty Trader and Investor Visas
F-1 and M-1: Student Visas
H-1B: Specialty Occupation (Professionals) Visas
H-2B/H-3: Skilled/Unskilled Worker and Trainee Visas
L-1A and L-1B: Intra-company Transfer of Manager/Executive
J-1 and Q-1: Exchange Visitor Visas
O-1: Extraordinary Ability Worker Visas
P-1: Artists and Athletes Visas
R-1:Religious Worker Visas
TN: Work Visas for Mexicans and Canadians under the North American Free Trade Agreement
Employment Verification (Form I-9)
Labor Certification
Temporary Protected Status (TPS)
Change of Status/Extend Status in U.S.

Naturalization/Citizenship

Naturalization
Derivative Citizenship
Posthumous Citizenship
Naturalization based on disabilities
Naturalization based on military service
Naturalization based on waiver of English requirement
Replacement of Certificate of Naturalization

Family Based “Green Cards”

Marriage Cases – Adjustment of Status in U.S.
U.S. Citizen filing for Parent, Child, Spouse or Sibling
Permanent Resident filing for Spouse or Unmarried Child(ren)
Consular Processing Abroad
Adoption/Orphans
Removal of conditional residency (jointly or seeking waiver)
Fiancé Visas (K-1, K-3)
Visa for spouses/minors of green card holders (V-1/V-2)
Abused spouses & children – VAWA Battered Spouse Petitions
Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) and “Aging Out” Cases
Advance Parole/Reentry Permits
Work Authorization
Extension & Change of Status

Employment Based “Green Cards”

EB-1: Foreign Nationals of Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Professors and Researchers and Multinational Executives and Managers
EB-2: Workers with Advanced Degrees or Exceptional Ability in the Sciences, Arts or Business
Schedule A workers
National Interest Waivers
EB-3: Skilled Workers and Professionals
EB-4: Special Immigrant Visas for Religious Workers
EB-5: Investor/Employment Creation Visas

Deportation/Removal

Voluntary Departure
Bond Hearings
Assist to Enroll in Alternatives to Detention Programs
Attorney Representation in Master Hearings
Attorney Representation in Individual Hearing
Prepare & File Waivers (212(c), 212(h), 212(i))
Prepare & File Cancellation of Removal
Motion for Prosecutorial Discretion – Administrative Closure
Consultations at Detention Facility
Motions to Reopen
Motions to Change Venue
Asylum/Refugee

Waivers – Reentry into U.S. & Adjust in U.S.

Provisional Waiver (I-601A)
Military Family – Parole in Place Waiver
Waiver for Fraud/Misrepresentation
Waiver for Crime Involving Moral Turpitude
Waiver seeking re-entry after past removal/deportation

Temporary Visas

B-1/B-2: Visitor Visas
E-1/E-2: Treaty Trader and Investor Visas
F-1 and M-1: Student Visas
H-1B: Specialty Occupation (Professionals) Visas
H-2B/H-3: Skilled/Unskilled Worker and Trainee Visas
L-1A and L-1B: Intra-company Transfer of Manager/Executive
J-1 and Q-1: Exchange Visitor Visas
O-1: Extraordinary Ability Worker Visas
P-1: Artists and Athletes Visas
R-1:Religious Worker Visas
TN: Work Visas for Mexicans and Canadians under the North American Free Trade Agreement
Employment Verification (Form I-9)
Labor Certification
Temporary Protected Status (TPS)
Change of Status/Extend Status in U.S.

Naturalization/Citizenship

Naturalization
Derivative Citizenship
Posthumous Citizenship
Naturalization based on disabilities
Naturalization based on military service
Naturalization based on waiver of English requirement
Replacement of Certificate of Naturalization

Fiance Visa

The Fiancé Visa (also known as K-Visa or K1 Visa) helps foreign-citizen fiancé(e)s of U.S. citizens enter the United States for the purpose of getting married. The visa also covers the minor children of the fiancé(e). It is often the quickest way to bring a foreign-citizen fiancé(e) into the U.S.

Our Orlando immigration law office assists couples through the Fiancé Visa process, including providing legal advice and representation when all does not go according to plan.

Apply For A Fiancé Visa With Assistance From Our Immigration Law Office
The Fiancé Visa was created to spare couples the long separation that can occur with waiting for immigration applications or green card approvals. But there are several steps that the U.S. citizen (referred to as the petitioner) must take and requirements that must be met before the K1 Visa will be allowed. At best, the process can take several months before the fiancé(e) is allowed into the country. Once the fiancé(e) is allowed entry, the marriage must take place within 90 days of arriving in the U.S. and file for adjustment of status in order to get your green card and to remain legally in the United States.

An Orlando immigration attorney can expedite the process by making sure you follow all of the necessary steps and requirements. Any mistakes can delay the process and affect approval. We can also assist with the fiancé(e)s green card application and status adjustment afterward.

Contact Orlando immigration attorney Gail Seeram at the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 for a free consultation.

Renew Green Card

You should renew green card if you are a permanent resident with a card valid for 10 years and the card is either expired or will expire within the next 6 months.

If you are outside the United States and your green card will expire within 6 months (but you will return within 1 year of your departure from the United States and before the card expires), you should file for your renewal card as soon as you return to the United States.

If you have a previous version of the alien registration card or lost your green card, then you must replace it with a current green card.

Child Status Protection Act

Green card and immigration applications can take a long time to process. In some cases, children who apply based on their parent’s immigration status can “age out” of their child protections and classification if they turn 21 before their application has been approved.

The Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) modifies the legal definition of “child” for the purposes of immigration. It is intended to help young people who have turned 21 before their green card or resident status is granted, but after they have submitted their application for such. The CSPA essentially freezes the applicant’s age as being the age they were when they submitted their Form I-130. This can help speed up the green card application process since the child still qualifies as an immediate relative of the parent.

The CSPA helps families stay together and protects beneficiaries who applied while under the age of 21 from aging out of child protections even if they have turned 21.

Our Orlando immigration attorney helps families take advantage of CSPA protections while they await their immigration applications.

Eligibility

The CSPA provides protections for the children of:

  • Immigrant families
  • Employment-based immigrants
  • Some immigrants who petition for visas on the basis of humanitarian programs

How Our Florida Immigration Law Office Can Help

While CPSA exists to protect families, the process remains complicated. Our Orlando immigration attorney helps families navigate immigration laws and the CSPA to ensure they meet all of the procedural and material requirements necessary to stay in the U.S.

Contact Orlando immigration law office, the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 to arrange a free initial consultation of your CPSA case.

Deportation-Waivers

Bond Hearing

If your family member or friend is detained at an immigration detention center, then our office can file for a bond/custody redetermination hearing before an immigration judge. The bond hearing is separate and apart and is not part of the removal/deportation hearings known as a master hearing and individual hearing.

There are several alternatives to detentions that may be granted, such as released on own recognizance, bond and an anklet monitoring system. In some cases, mandatory detention may apply to the alien and no bond/custody redetermination will be granted. Our office will use our experience and expertise in the deportation-waivers defense to reunite you with your detained family or friend.

Stay of Removal

In cases where the alien has a final order of removal, our office may request a motion to stay removal and appeal to the discretion of Immigration and Custom Enforcement so the removal order can be set aside for a period of time.

Prosecutorial Discretion

Immigration & Custom Enforcement (ICE) attorneys can exercise prosecutorial discretion on a case-by-case basis to administratively close or terminate a pending removal/deportation case. Immigration judges are prepared to adjudicate prosecutorial discretion motions filed with the court. In most cases, a request for prosecutorial discretion would result in administrative closure of a pending removal/deportation case.

“Administrative closure” is an order by the court that removes the case from the immigration court’s calendar of hearings. Administrative closure does not mean that your case is completed or that the court has granted any application for relief that you may have filed with the court. If the court orders your case administratively closed, it simply means you will have no further hearings unless you or Department of Homeland Security specifically ask the court to schedule a hearing.

Voluntary Departure

Voluntary departure is the most common form of relief from removal and may be granted by Immigration Judges, as well as the Department of Homeland Security. Voluntary departure avoids the stigma of formal removal by allowing an otherwise removable alien to depart the United States at his or her own personal expense and return to his or her home country, or another country if the individual can secure an entry there. It is important to note that aliens granted voluntary departure must depart within the time specified by the Immigration Judge. Although an Immigration Judge has the discretion to set a shorter deadline, aliens granted voluntary departure prior to the completion of removal proceedings must depart within 120 days, and those granted such relief at the conclusion of removal proceedings must depart within 60 days.

Cancellation of Removal

This form of discretionary relief is available to qualifying lawful permanent residents and qualifying non-permanent residents.

For lawful permanent residents, cancellation of removal may be granted if the individual:

  1. Has been a lawful permanent resident for at least 5 years;
  2. Has continuously resided in the United States for at least 7 years after having been lawfully admitted; and
  3. Has not been convicted of an “aggravated felony,” a term that is more broadly defined within immigration law than the application of the term “felony” in non-immigration settings.

Cancellation of removal for non-permanent residents may be granted if the alien:

  1. Has been continuously present for at least 10 years;
  2. Has been a person of good moral character during that time;
  3. Has not been convicted of an offense that would make him or her removable; and
  4. Demonstrates that removal would result in exceptional and extremely unusual hardship to his or her immediate family members (limited to the alien’s spouse, parent, or child) who are either U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents.

Asylum

In certain cases, our office can file asylum applications and defend asylum cases in immigration court. The asylum applicant must demonstrate an inability to return to his or her home country because of past persecution or a well-founded fear of future persecution based upon his or her race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. However, an alien may be ineligible for asylum under certain circumstances, including having failed to file an asylum application within an alien’s first year of arrival in the United States, being convicted of an aggravated felony, or having been found to be a danger to national security. Similar forms of relief are Withholding of Removal and applications under the United Nations Convention Against Torture.

Adjustment of Status

This form of discretionary relief is available to change an alien’s status from a non-immigrant to a lawful permanent resident. Aliens who have been previously admitted into the United States can apply for adjustment of status, while aliens in removal proceedings apply before an Immigration Judge. Several conditions must be met, including that the alien is admissible for permanent residence and an immigrant visa is immediately available at the time of application. Aliens who qualify for visas allowing an adjustment of status are often petitioned for by a spouse (or another family member) or an employer. Certain individuals, including criminals and aliens who fail to appear for proceedings or fail to depart after a grant of voluntary departure, and those who were ordered removed may be ineligible for adjustment of status.

Appeal & Motion to Reopen/Reconsider

Alternatively, if the alien has a final order of removal, our office may consider filing an appeal of the immigration judge’s decision with the Board of Immigration Appeals or the Federal Courts.  Also, a motion to reopen/reconsider the immigration judge decision may be filed in certain immigration cases.

To be eligible for a waiver of removability, you must establish hardship to yourself or your close family members if you were to be removed from the U.S.  The following waivers may be sought during removal/deportation proceedings in immigration court:

– INA 212(c)

– INA 212(h)

– INA 212(i)

– INA

If you are ineligible for a immigrant visa or green card based on one or more of the immigration laws, you may be able to apply for a waiver. The immigrant visa category that you are applying for will determine whether a waiver of inadmissibility is available. The consular officer interviewing you at the U.S. Embassy will tell you if you may apply for a waiver and will provide detailed instructions for how to apply.  Our office prepares and files the waiver with an abundance of supporting documents to prove the extreme hardship to your relatives in the United States and argues on various grounds why the waiver of inadmissibility should be granted.

Immigration Appeals

Have you applied for immigration benefits but disagree with the outcome of the procedure? My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases and can help you appeal the immigration decision.

Applicants for immigration benefits or respondents in immigration court could file an immigration appeal if they disagreed with the decision of an adjudicating officer or immigration judge.

It is possible to file an immigration appeal and fight back the injustice.

  • Did the Immigration Judge overlook or ignore evidence to your case?
  • Did the Judge insufficiently weight in the testimony of one of your witnesses?
  • Was an immigration court rule or procedure used in an unfair manner?

If you lost your case because there has been a mistake in the application of the immigration laws, you have the right to file an immigration appeal. My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases and can help you fight back.

The Consequences of Losing Your Appeal

As you may already know, if you lost your case at Immigration Court, you might face deportation. Therefore, you must file an immigration appeal to prevent a possible deportation, which would separate you from your spouse and from your family.

You must win your immigration appeal to become or to remain a lawful permanent resident and to secure a future for your family in the United States.

Don’t risk jeopardizing your future. Trust the legal advice of My Orlando Immigration Lawyer with convenient offices in Orlando and Kissimmee.

How to File an Immigration Appeal

If you would like to challenge the Immigration Judge’s decision, you need to file an appeal with the Board of Immigration Appeals and we recommend seeking an immigration attorney to help you with the process, which sometimes can be complicated and cumbersome.

The immigration appeals process can take months or sometimes years but is worth filing if you have received an unfair treatment.

Contact Orlando Immigration Appeals Attorney Gail Seeram at the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 for a free initial consultation of your immigration case.

Immigration Bond

Are you in immigration custody and are required to pay an immigration bond? My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases. We can help you obtain release from immigration custody. We can also request a bond hearing to remove the bond or to lower the one you already have.

If you were in immigration custody and an officer had already set a bond for you, then you should try to pay this bond.

However, if an immigration official has not yet set a bond for you or you were unable to pay this bond, My Orlando Immigration Attorney could help you. Indeed, we can help you request a bond hearing in front of an Immigration Judge who will make a decision on whether or not to give you a bond or lower the one you already have.

When it comes to reducing or to removing the bond, the Judge will primarily consider three points:

  • That you are not a flight risk and that you will attend all future court hearings;
  • That you are not a danger to the community and are rehabilitated after any crimes you may have committed;
  • That you have relief from removal.

My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases. We can help you show the Judge that you comply with all three points and that you deserve to have your bond reduced or removed.

Let us help you show the Judge how you are not a flight risk and are not a danger to the community. Let us help you show the Judge how great your chances are of winning your immigration case and of staying in the United States. It is more likely for a Judge to reduce or to lower your bond if he or she can see your compliance with all three points.

My Orlando Immigration Attorney serves Orlando and Central Florida cases. We can advocate for your release from immigration custody and for your issuance of an immigration bond.

Contact Orlando Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram at the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 for a free initial consultation of your immigration case.

Family Immigration

Immediate Relatives (Spouse, Parent & Child under age 21) of U.S. Citizen

Immediate relatives have special immigration priority and do not have to wait in line for a visa number – visas are available immediately.

If your immediate relative is lawfully in the United States, he/she can apply for adjustment of status to become a permanent resident. The immediate relative is eligible to receive employment authorization while the adjustment of status petition is pending. Processing time is approximately 3-6 months.

If your immediate relative is currently outside the United States, then they can become a permanent resident through consular processing. Consular processing is when U.S. Citizenship & immigration Services works with the Department of State to issue a visa on an approved Form I-130 petition when a visa is available. You may then travel on the visa and will officially become a permanent resident when admitted at a U.S. port of entry.

Preference Category

Immigrant visa numbers for individuals in a “preference category” are limited, so are not always available. Because the demand is higher than the supply of visas for a given year for some categories, a visa queue (waiting list) forms. To distribute the visas among all preference categories, the Department of State gives out the visas by providing visa numbers according to the preference category and one’s priority date. For family sponsored immigration, the priority date is the date that the petition is properly filed with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The family-sponsored preferences are:

  1. unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens;
  2. spouses, children, and unmarried sons and daughters of permanent resident aliens;
  3. married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens;
  4. brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens.

For current visa availability, please CLICK HERE view current visa bulletin.

Conditional Permanent Resident

Your permanent residence status is conditional if it is based on a marriage that was less than 2 years old on the day you were given permanent residence. You are given conditional resident status on the day you are lawfully admitted to the United States on an immigrant visa or adjustment of your status to permanent residence.

If your status is conditional, you must remove these conditions and prove you did not get married to evade the immigration laws of the United States at least 90 days before your conditional status (green card) expires.

Resident / Green Card

RESIDENT – Family/Marriage Based

Immediate Relatives (Spouse, Parent & Child under age 21) of U.S. Citizen

Immediate relatives have special immigration priority and do not have to wait in line for a visa number – visas are available immediately.

If your immediate relative is lawfully in the United States, he/she can apply for adjustment of status to become a permanent resident. The immediate relative is eligible to receive employment authorization while the adjustment of status petition is pending. Processing time is approximately 3-6 months.

If your immediate relative is currently outside the United States, then they can become a permanent resident through consular processing. Consular processing is when U.S. Citizenship & immigration Services works with the Department of State to issue a visa on an approved Form I-130 petition when a visa is available. You may then travel on the visa and will officially become a permanent resident when admitted at a U.S. port of entry.

Preference Category

Immigrant visa numbers for individuals in a “preference category” are limited, so are not always available. Because the demand is higher than the supply of visas for a given year for some categories, a visa queue (waiting list) forms. To distribute the visas among all preference categories, the Department of State gives out the visas by providing visa numbers according to the preference category and one’s priority date. For family sponsored immigration, the priority date is the date that the petition is properly filed with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The family-sponsored preferences are:

  1. unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens;
  2. spouses, children, and unmarried sons and daughters of permanent resident aliens;
  3. married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens;
  4. brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens.

For current visa availability, please CLICK HERE view current visa bulletin.

Conditional Permanent Resident

Your permanent residence status is conditional if it is based on a marriage that was less than 2 years old on the day you were given permanent residence. You are given conditional resident status on the day you are lawfully admitted to the United States on an immigrant visa or adjustment of your status to permanent residence.

If your status is conditional, you must remove these conditions and prove you did not get married to evade the immigration laws of the United States at least 90 days before your conditional status (green card) expires.

Child Status Protection Act

In certain cases, the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) may allow you to retain the classification of “child” even if you have reached age 21. Generally, your age is “frozen” as of the date your U.S. citizen parent files Form I-130 for you.

RESIDENT – Humanitarian Benefits & Victims of Crime

U Visa

The U nonimmigrant status (also known as the U visa) is set aside for victims of crimes who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse as a result of the crime and who are willing to assist law enforcement and government officials in the investigation or prosecution of the criminal activity. Those who have been granted U nonimmigrant status may file for a green card (permanent residence) after meeting certain requirements.

T Visa

T Nonimmigrant Status (T Visa) is set aside for those who are or have been victims of human trafficking and are willing to assist law enforcement in the investigation or prosecution of acts of trafficking. The T nonimmigrant visa is valid for 3 years and a visa holder may be eligible to apply for permanent residence (Green Card) after 3 years in T nonimmigrant status.

Battered Spouse

As a battered spouse, child or parent, you may file a self-petition for an immigrant visa petition. If you are a self-petitioning spouse or child and you meet all filing requirements, you will receive a notice (Prima Facie Determination Notice) valid for 150 days that you can present to government agencies that provide certain public benefits to certain victims of domestic violence. If you are approved, you may be eligible to file for a green card.

Reinstatement due to death of Petitioner

Humanitarian reinstatement may only be requested by the principal beneficiary when the petitioner of an approved Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, has died. Humanitarian reinstatement cannot be granted if the petitioner died while the petition was pending. Humanitarian reinstatement is a discretionary benefit. Exercising discretion means weighing positive factors against negative factors to make a decision. In addition to meeting the basic requirements for humanitarian reinstatement, your request must warrant a favorable exercise of discretion, meaning that the “pros” in granting your request outweigh the “cons.”

Parole in Place – Illegal Family Members of Military Personnel

The grant of “parole in place” allows illegal aliens who entered the U.S. without inspection or illegal aliens subject to the 3 years and 10 years ban for unlawful presence to adjustment status in the United States without having to leave the United States. The decision whether to grant parole in place under INA § 212(d)(5)(A) is discretionary (on a case-by-case basis, looking at “urgent humanitarian reasons ”). The applicant must be a spouse, child or parent of an Active Duty member of the U.S. Armed Forces, an individual in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve or an individual who previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces or the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve.

Asylum/Refugee

You may only apply for asylum if you are arriving in or already physically present in the United States. To apply for asylum in the United States, you may ask for asylum at a port-of-entry (airport, seaport, or border crossing), or, if you are already in the United States, you may file Form I-589, Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal, at the appropriate Service Center. You may apply for asylum regardless of your immigration status, whether you are here legally or illegally. You must apply for asylum within one year of your last arrival in the United States, unless you can demonstrate that there are changed circumstances that materially affect your eligibility for asylum or extraordinary circumstances directly related to your failure to file within one year. You must apply for asylum within a reasonable time given the circumstances.

A refugee is a person who has fled his or her country of origin because of past persecution or a fear of future persecution based upon race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group. If the person is not in the United States, he or she may apply for inclusion in the U.S. refugee program. If the person is already in the United States, he or she may apply for the U.S. asylum program.

RESIDENT – Visa Lottery

The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program (DV Program) makes up to 50,000 immigrant visas available annually, drawn from random selection among all entries to individuals who are from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. Most lottery winners reside outside the United States and immigrate through consular processing and issuance of an immigrant visa.

The Department of State chooses the winners of the Diversity Visa Lottery program randomly through a computer-generated lottery drawing. Anyone selected under the Diversity Visa Lottery program will be notified directly by the U.S. Department of State through the mail. Applicants can check the status of their application to see if they are a winner by visiting www.dvlottery.state.gov. If the winner is granted permanent residency, s/he will be authorized to live and work in the United States along with their spouse and children under age 21.

Successful Diversity Visa (DV) entrants must be eligible to receive a visa by qualifying based on education, work, and other requirements. The law and regulations require that every DV entrant must have at least: A high school education or its equivalent; or Two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years’ training or experience.

RESIDENT – Replace/Renew Green Card & Change of Address

Replace/Renew Green Card

You should renew your green card if you are a permanent resident with a card valid for 10 years and the card is either expired or will expire within the next 6 months.

If you are outside the United States and your green card will expire within 6 months (but you will return within 1 year of your departure from the United States and before the card expires), you should file for your renewal card as soon as you return to the United States.

If you have a previous version of the alien registration card or lost your green card, then you must replace it with a current green card.

Change of Address

Most non-U.S. citizens must report a change of address within 10 days of moving within the United States or its territories. You can change your address online and update your address on any pending or recently approved applications and petitions.

U.S. Citizens who do not have an application or petition pending with U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) are only legally required to notify USCIS of a change of address if they have previously submitted a Form I-864 on behalf of someone who has become a permanent resident. If you have previously submitted a Form I-864 for someone who immigrated to the U.S., you must complete a Form I-865 within thirty days of the completion of your move.

Asylum

Every year, thousands of people come to the United States seeking asylum protections because they have suffered persecution or fear that they will suffer persecution in their home countries due to:

  • Race
  • Religion
  • Nationality
  • Membership in a particular social group
  • Political opinion

If you are eligible for asylum you may be permitted to remain in the United States, bring certain family members over to the US, and apply for legal permanent residence after one year. However, you must follow certain procedures and meet certain requirements in order to be granted asylum.

This is where our immigration law office can help.

Two Ways To Seek Help From An Asylum Attorney

Any non-US citizen may apply for asylum as long as they can provide proof of grounds for their fears of persecution and as long as they have been in the US for less than one year. There is no fee to apply for US asylum but you will be expected to attend a hearing with a United States asylum officer.

Our asylum attorney can help you seek asylum in the United States in one of two ways:

  1. Apply for Asylum with an Immigration Judge. If you have been placed in removal proceedings before an Immigration Judge you may apply for asylum with that same judge. This is considered a “Defensive Application”.
  1. File an Application for Asylum with US Citizenship and Immigration Services. If you have not yet faced removal proceedings, you may apply for asylum with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, regardless of your legal status in the United States. This is considered an “Affirmative Application”.

There are many considerations and requirements when applying for asylum that our Florida immigration attorney can help you navigate. Do not leave your safety and welfare to chance.

Contact Orlando Asylum Attorney Gail Seeram at the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 for a free initial consultation of your asylum case.

Citizenship

The United States has a long history of welcoming immigrants from all parts of the world. America values the contributions of immigrants who continue to enrich this country and preserve its legacy as a land of freedom and opportunity.

Deciding to become a U.S. citizen is one of the most important decisions in an individual’s life. If you decide to apply to become a U.S. citizen, you will be showing your commitment to the United States and your loyalty to its Constitution. In return, you are rewarded with all the rights and privileges that are part of U.S. citizenship.

Citizenship through Naturalization

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a foreign citizen or national after he or she fulfills certain requirements.

You may qualify for citizenship through the naturalization process if have been a permanent resident for at least 5 years and meet all other eligibility requirements.

You may qualify for citizenship through the naturalization process if you have been a permanent resident for 3 years or more and meet all eligibility requirements to file as a spouse of a U.S. citizen.

To become a naturalized U.S. citizen, you must pass the naturalization test. At your naturalization interview, you will be required to answer questions about your application and background. You will also take an English and Civics (U.S. Government & History) tests.

English Language Exemptions

You Are Exempt From The English Language Requirement, But Are Still Required To Take The Civics U.S. History Test If You Are:

  • Age 50 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident (green card holder) in the United States for 20 years   (commonly referred to as the “50/20” exception).
    OR
  • Age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years (commonly referred to as the “55/15” exception).

AND

  • You may be permitted to take the civics test in your native language, but only if your understanding of spoken English is insufficient to conduct a valid examination in English.

Exception to the Civics U.S. History Test

If you are age 65 or older and have been a permanent resident for at least 20 years at the time of filing for naturalization, you will be given special consideration regarding the civics requirement.  You will only have to learn a selected 20 questions out of the 100 provided civics U.S. history questions.

Medical Disability Exceptions to English and Civics

You may be eligible for an exception to the English and civics naturalization requirements if you are unable to comply with these requirements because of a physical or developmental disability or a mental impairment.

Continuous Residence Exceptions

If you are engaged in certain kinds of overseas employment you may be eligible for an exception to the continuous residence requirement.

Citizenship through Parents

You may already be a U.S. citizen and not need to apply for naturalization if your biological or adoptive parent(s) became a U.S. citizen before you reached the age of 18.

Work Visas

TEMPORARY WORK VISAS 

E-1: Treaty Trader

The E-1 nonimmigrant work visas allows a national of a treaty country (a country with which the United States maintains a treaty of commerce and navigation) to be admitted to the United States solely to engage in international trade on his or her own behalf. Certain employees of such a person or of a qualifying organization may also be eligible for this classification.

E-2: Treaty Investor

The E-2 nonimmigrant work visas allows a national of a treaty country (a country with which the United States maintains a treaty of commerce and navigation) to be admitted to the United States when investing a substantial amount of capital in a U.S. business. Certain employees of such a person or of a qualifying organization may also be eligible for this classification.

E-3: Certain Specialty Occupation Professionals from Australia

The E-3 nonimmigrant work visas applies only to nationals of Australia. You must be coming to the United States solely to perform services in a specialty occupation. The specialty occupation requires theoretical and practical application of a body of knowledge in professional fields and at least the attainment of a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.

H-1B: Specialty Occupation

The H-1B visa has an annual numerical limit “cap” of 65,000 visas each fiscal year. The first 20,000 petitions filed on behalf of beneficiaries with a U.S. master’s degree or higher are exempt from the cap. Additionally, H-1B workers who are petitioned for or employed at an institution of higher education or its affiliated or related nonprofit entities or a nonprofit research organization, or a government research organization are not subject to this numerical cap.

This visa category applies to people who wish to perform services in a specialty occupation, services of exceptional merit and ability relating to a Department of Defense (DOD) cooperative research and development project, or services as a fashion model of distinguished merit or ability.

H-1C: Registered Nurse

The H-1C nonimmigrant work visas is for foreign nurses coming to the United States temporarily to perform services as a registered nurse in a health professional shortage area as determined by the Department of Labor (DOL).

H-2A: Temporary Agricultural Worker

The H-2A program allows U.S. employers or U.S. agents who meet specific regulatory requirements to bring foreign nationals to the United States to fill temporary agricultural jobs.

H-2B: Temporary Non-Agricultural Worker

The H-2B program allows U.S. employers or U.S. agents who meet specific regulatory requirements to bring foreign nationals to the United States to fill temporary nonagricultural jobs.

H-3: Trainee

The H-3 nonimmigrant work visas allows foreign nationals coming temporarily to the United States as either a:

Trainee to receive training in any field of endeavor, other than graduate medical education or training, that is not available in the foreign national’s home country.

Special Education Exchange Visitor to participate in a special education exchange visitor training program that provides for practical training and experience in the education of children with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities.

I: Representative of Foreign Media

You may be eligible for the I, Representatives of Foreign Media, nonimmigrant visa, if you: Represent a foreign information media outlet (press, radio, film, or other foreign information media); Are coming to the United States to engage solely in this profession; and Have a home office in a foreign country.

Occupations under this category include reporters, film crews, editors, and similar occupations. Any spouse and children under the age of 21 may accompany or follow to join an I nonimmigrant.

L-1: Intracompany Transferee

The L-1A nonimmigrant work visas enables a U.S. employer to transfer an executive or manager from one of its affiliated foreign offices to one of its offices in the United States. This classification also enables a foreign company which does not yet have an affiliated U.S. office to send an executive or manager to the United States with the purpose of establishing one.

O-1: Individuals with an extraordinary ability

The O-1 nonimmigrant work visas is for the individual who possesses extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics, or who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry and has been recognized nationally or internationally for those achievements.

P-1: Internationally Recognized Artist/Athlete

The P-1 classification applies to you if you are coming to the U.S. temporarily to perform at a specific athletic competition as an athlete, individually or as part of a group or team, at an internationally recognized level of performance.

Q-1: Cultural Exchange

You may be eligible for a Q-1 nonimmigrant visa if you are seeking to participate in an international cultural exchange program. The Q nonimmigrant exchange program is for the purpose of providing practical training and employment, and to share the history, culture, and traditions of your home country with the United States.

TN

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada and Mexico. The TN nonimmigrant classification permits qualified Canadian and Mexican citizens to seek temporary entry into the United States to engage in business activities at a professional level.

R-1:

An R-1 is a foreign national who is coming to the United States temporarily to be employed at least part time (average of at least 20 hours per week) by a non-profit religious organization in the United States (or an organization which is affiliated with the religious denomination in the United States) to work as a minister or in a religious vocation or occupation.

PERMANENT (GREEN CARD) WORK VISAS

EB-1: Priority Worker

You may be eligible for an employment-based, first-preference visa if you have an extraordinary ability, are an outstanding professor or researcher, or are a multinational executive or manager. Each occupational category has certain requirements that must be met:

Extraordinary Ability:

You must be able to demonstrate extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics through sustained national or international acclaim. Your achievements must be recognized in your field through extensive documentation. No offer of employment is required.

Outstanding professors and researchers:

You must demonstrate international recognition for your outstanding achievements in a particular academic field. You must have at least 3 years experience in teaching or research in that academic area. You must be entering the United States in order to pursue tenure or tenure track teaching or comparable research position at a university or other institution of higher education.

Multinational manager or executive:

You must have been employed outside the United States in the 3 years preceding the petition for at least 1 year by a firm or corporation and you must be seeking to enter the United States to continue service to that firm or organization. Your employment must have been outside the United States in a managerial or executive capacity and with the same employer, an affiliate, or a subsidiary of the employer.

EB-2: Advanced-degree holders and Aliens of Exceptional Ability

You may be eligible for an employment-based, second preference visa if you are a member of the professions holding an advanced degree or its equivalent, or a foreign national who has exceptional ability. Below are the occupational categories and requirements:

Advanced Degree: The job you apply for must require an advanced degree and you must possess such a degree or its equivalent (a baccalaureate degree plus 5 years progressive work experience in the field).

Exceptional Ability: You must be able to show exceptional ability in the sciences, arts, or business. Exceptional ability “means a degree of expertise significantly above that ordinarily encountered in the sciences, arts, or business.”

National Interest Waiver: Aliens seeking a national interest waiver are requesting that the Labor Certification be waived because it is in the interest of the United States. Though the jobs that qualify for a national interest waiver are not defined by statute, national interest waivers are usually granted to those who have exceptional ability (see above) and whose employment in the United States would greatly benefit the national.

EB-3: Professional, Skilled, and Other Workers

You may be eligible for this immigrant visa preference category if you are a skilled worker, professional, or other worker.

“Skilled workers” are persons whose job requires a minimum of 2 years training or work experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature.

“Professionals” are persons whose job requires at least a U.S. baccalaureate degree or a foreign equivalent and are a member of the professions.

The “other workers” subcategory is for persons performing unskilled labor requiring less than 2 years training or experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature.

Skilled Workers: You must be able to demonstrate at least 2 years of job experience or training. You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States.

Professionals:

You must be able to demonstrate that you possess a U.S. baccalaureate degree or foreign degree equivalent, and that a baccalaureate degree is the normal requirement for entry into the occupation. You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States and Education and experience may not be substituted for a baccalaureate degree.

Unskilled Workers (Other Workers): You must be capable, at the time the petition is filed on your behalf, of performing unskilled labor (requiring less than 2 years training or experience), that is not of a temporary or seasonal nature, for which qualified workers are not available in the United States.

EB-4: Special Immigrants

You may be eligible for an employment-based, fourth preference visa if you are a special immigrant. The following special immigrants are eligible for the fourth preference visa:

  • Religious Workers
  • Broadcasters
  • Iraqi/Afghan Translators
  • Iraqis Who Have Assisted the United States
  • International Organization Employees
  • Physicians
  • Armed Forces Members
  • Panama Canal Zone Employees
  • Retired NATO-6 employees
  • Spouses and Children of Deceased NATO-6 employees

EB-5: Employment Creation/Investors

All EB-5 investors must invest in a new commercial enterprise. Commercial enterprise means any for-profit activity formed for the ongoing conduct of lawful business. Create or preserve at least 10 full-time jobs for qualifying U.S. workers within two years (or under certain circumstances, within a reasonable time after the two-year period) of the immigrant investor’s admission to the United States as a Conditional Permanent Resident.

The minimum qualifying investment in the United States is $1 million.

The minimum qualifying investment either within a high-unemployment area or rural area in the United States is $500,000.

The EB-5 investor (and his or her derivative family members) is granted conditional permanent residence for a two-year period upon the approval of the I-485 application or upon entry into the United States with an EB-5 immigrant visa.

Work Visas – Permanent

EB-1:

You may be eligible for an employment-based, first-preference visa if you have an extraordinary ability, are an outstanding professor or researcher, or are a multinational executive or manager. Each occupational category has certain requirements that must be met:.

Extraordinary Ability: You must be able to demonstrate extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics through sustained national or international acclaim. Your achievements must be recognized in your field through extensive documentation. No offer of employment is required.

Outstanding professors and researchers: You must demonstrate international recognition for your outstanding achievements in a particular academic field. You must have at least 3 years experience in teaching or research in that academic area. You must be entering the United States in order to pursue tenure or tenure track teaching or comparable research position at a university or other institution of higher education.

Multinational manager or executive: You must have been employed outside the United States in the 3 years preceding the petition for at least 1 year by a firm or corporation and you must be seeking to enter the United States to continue service to that firm or organization. Your employment must have been outside the United States in a managerial or executive capacity and with the same employer, an affiliate, or a subsidiary of the employer.

EB-2:

You may be eligible for an employment-based, second preference visa if you are a member of the professions holding an advanced degree or its equivalent, or a foreign national who has exceptional ability. Below are the occupational categories and requirements:

Advanced Degree: The job you apply for must require an advanced degree and you must possess such a degree or its equivalent (a baccalaureate degree plus 5 years progressive work experience in the field).

Exceptional Ability: You must be able to show exceptional ability in the sciences, arts, or business. Exceptional ability “means a degree of expertise significantly above that ordinarily encountered in the sciences, arts, or business.”

National Interest Waiver: Aliens seeking a national interest waiver are requesting that the Labor Certification be waived because it is in the interest of the United States. Though the jobs that qualify for a national interest waiver are not defined by statute, national interest waivers are usually granted to those who have exceptional ability (see above) and whose employment in the United States would greatly benefit the national.

EB-3:

You may be eligible for this immigrant visa preference category if you are a skilled worker, professional, or other worker.

Skilled workers” are persons whose job requires a minimum of 2 years training or work experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature.

Professionals” are persons whose job requires at least a U.S. baccalaureate degree or a foreign equivalent and are a member of the professions.

The “other workers” subcategory is for persons performing unskilled labor requiring less than 2 years training or experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature.

Skilled Workers: You must be able to demonstrate at least 2 years of job experience or training. You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States.

Professionals: You must be able to demonstrate that you possess a U.S. baccalaureate degree or foreign degree equivalent, and that a baccalaureate degree is the normal requirement for entry into the occupation. You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States and Education and experience may not be substituted for a baccalaureate degree.

Unskilled Workers (Other Workers): You must be capable, at the time the petition is filed on your behalf, of performing unskilled labor (requiring less than 2 years training or experience), that is not of a temporary or seasonal nature, for which qualified workers are not available in the United States.

EB-4:

You may be eligible for an employment-based, fourth preference visa if you are a special immigrant. The following special immigrants are eligible for the fourth preference visa:

  • Religious Workers
  • Broadcasters
  • Iraqi/Afghan Translators
  • Iraqis Who Have Assisted the United States
  • International Organization Employees
  • Physicians
  • Armed Forces Members
  • Panama Canal Zone Employees
  • Retired NATO-6 employees
  • Spouses and Children of Deceased NATO-6 employees

EB-5:

All EB-5 investors must invest in a new commercial enterprise. Commercial enterprise means any for-profit activity formed for the ongoing conduct of lawful business. Create or preserve at least 10 full-time jobs for qualifying U.S. workers within two years (or under certain circumstances, within a reasonable time after the two-year period) of the immigrant investor’s admission to the United States as a Conditional Permanent Resident.

The minimum qualifying investment in the United States is $1 million.
The minimum qualifying investment either within a high-unemployment area or rural area in the United States is $500,000.

The EB-5 investor (and his or her derivative family members) is granted conditional permanent residence for a two-year period upon the approval of the I-485 application or upon entry into the United States with an EB-5 immigrant visa.

Student Visas & DACA

DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – DREAMERS

In September 2012, U.S. Immigration started deferring action for certain childhood arrivals and issuing employment authorization for a period of two years. Beginning in September 2014, the initial two-year grants of deferred action for early recipients of DACA are due to expire under their own terms, and the renewal process will allow eligible individuals to request and receive an extension of their deferred action without experiencing any lapse in their lawful presence or work authorization.

You should submit your DACA renewal request about 120 days (4 months) before your current period of deferred action will expire. If you submit your request more than 150 days (5 months) before your current period expires, Immigration may reject it and return it to you with instructions to resubmit it closer to the expiration date.

DACA applications may be submitted if you:

  1. Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
  2. Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
  3. Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
  4. Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  5. Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;
  6. Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  7. Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

F-1

The F-1 Visa (student visas) allows you to enter the United States as a full-time student at an accredited college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school, or other academic institution or in a language training program. You must be enrolled in a program or course of study that culminates in a degree, diploma, or certificate and your school must be authorized by the U.S. government to accept international students. F-1 students may not work off-campus during the first academic year, but may accept on-campus employment subject to certain conditions and restrictions.

J-1

The J-1 classification (exchange visitors) is authorized for those who intend to participate in an approved program for the purpose of teaching, instructing or lecturing, studying, observing, conducting research, consulting, demonstrating special skills, receiving training, or to receive graduate medical education or training.
In carrying out the responsibilities of the Exchange Visitor Program, the Department of State designates public and private entities to act as exchange sponsors. J-1 nonimmigrants are therefore sponsored by an exchange program that is designated as such by the U.S. Department of State. These programs are designed to promote the interchange or persons, knowledge, and skills, in the fields of education, arts, and science.

M-1

The M-1 visa (vocational student) category includes students in vocational or other nonacademic programs, other than language training.

Deportation Defense

Deportation is the forcible removal of people who are already in the United States, whether they are here either legally or illegally. It can be initiated for many reasons, the most often being immigration violations or criminal charges and convictions. But the removal process must follow certain procedures, which gives you time to build a defense.

If you or a loved one has been scheduled for a deportation or removal hearing, you need legal representation from an experienced Orlando immigration attorney. Your attorney will evaluate your situation to determine the best possible deportation defense strategies to fight the removal.

What To Expect During Deportation Defense Proceedings

The noncitizen will have to attend several court hearings. There will be a bond hearing, a master hearing and an individual hearing. At each of these hearings, the noncitizen will appear before an immigration judge and an attorney from the Office of Chief Counsel. With our immigration law office presenting the deportation defense, the noncitizen will have an opportunity to answer to the immigration-related charges and present a form of relief such as asylum or waiver seeking to remain in the United States.

Navigating these hearings yourself, without a Florida immigration attorney to look out for your best interests, is risky. The process can be scary, confusing, and complicated, especially in the current political climate. You do not have to face deportation alone. Representation by an asylum attorney or immigration law office is the best way to ensure you follow all rules and procedures to have your argument against deportation heard.

Even if you have already had your case heard and been unsuccessful, you may be able to appeal the ruling and if your appeal is unsuccessful, we can help you explore other options for remaining in the U.S.

Arrange A Free Consultation With Our Immigration Law Office

If you have been placed in deportation proceedings, contact Florida immigration attorney Gail Seeram right away. Attorney Seeram handles all types of deportation cases, including asylum and criminal cases and will advocate for your best interests.

Contact our Orlando immigration law office at +1 (407) 292-7730 to schedule a free consultation.

Visitor Visa

Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), tourism, pleasure or visiting (visa category B-2), or a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2).

B-1: Temporary Business Visitor

You may be eligible for a B-1 visitor visa if you will be participating in business activities of a commercial or professional nature in the United States. If you are in the United States in another valid nonimmigrant status, you may be eligible to change to B-1 status.

B-2: Temporary Tourist Visitor

If the purpose of the planned travel is recreational in nature, including tourism, visiting friends or relatives, rest, or is related to medical treatment, activities of a fraternal, social, or service nature, or participation by amateurs who will receive no remuneration in musical, sports and similar events or contests, then a visitor visa (B-2) would be the appropriate type of visa for the travel. Persons planning to travel to the United States for a different purpose including students, temporary workers, crew members, or journalists, must apply for a different category of visa.

Visa Waiver Program

The Visa Waiver Program (VWP) enables nationals of 35 participating countries to travel to the United States for tourism or business for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. Nationals of VWP countries must meet eligibility requirements to travel without a visa on the VWP. VWP travelers are required to have a valid authorization through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) prior to travel.

K-1: Fiancé VIsa

The K-visa categories for fiancé(e)s of U.S. citizens and their accompanying minor children (K-1 and K-2 visas) were created so fiancé(e)s can be spared a long separation from their intended spouse. Upon entry to the U.S., fiancé(e)s must marry their U.S. citizen spouse within 90 days and file for adjustment of status in order to get your green card and to remain legally in the United States.

i751

Form I-751 is a Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence related to a Conditional Green Card. It is mandatory that an I-751 be filed before the two-year expiration date of the Green Card. Failure to file Form I-751 will lead to termination of conditional residency and can lead to deportation and/or removal proceedings in immigration court.

It is for these reasons that it is very important for Conditional Green Card holders to consult with our Orlando immigration attorney if they have questions, concerns, or problems related to the I-751.

What is Conditional Residency?

Conditional residency is assigned to foreign-born individuals who marry a U.S. citizen. Permanent residence status is classified as conditional if it is based on a marriage of less than 2 years. This classification is applied to help prevent individuals from trying to evade U.S. immigration laws by marrying a U.S. citizen. The only way to remove the conditional classification is to file Form I-751.

Eligibility Criteria

Individuals are eligible to apply for removal of conditions on their permanent residence if they:

  • Are married to the same U.S. citizen or permanent resident after 2 years. Children may be included in the application if they received their conditional-resident status at the same time or within 90 days of the foreign-born parent.
  • Are a child that cannot be included in his/her parents’ application.
  • Are a widow or widower who entered into the marriage in good faith.
  • Are divorced, but entered into the marriage in good faith. Marriages that have been annulled may also provide eligibility for I-751.
  • Entered into the marriage in good faith, but either the card holder or their child were battered or subjected to extreme hardship by their spouse.

File Form I-751 With Help From Our Orlando Immigration Law Office

Spouses must file Form I-751 together, but that doesn’t mean you have to do it alone. Orlando immigration lawyer, Gail Seeram can help you file Form I-751 on time or request a waiver to filing the petition jointly.

If you are nearing the date for the expiration of your Conditional Green Card, contact our immigration law office right away at 1-877-GAIL-LAW or 407-292-7730 to schedule a free consultation.

Immigration Court

Have you or a loved one been served with a Notice to Appear? My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases and can help you overcome deportation, removal proceedings, and other serious immigration notices.

What Is a Notice to Appear?

A Notice to Appear (an “NTA”), is an official document that triggers the initiation of removal proceedings against you.

If you received an NTA, you must appear in Immigration Court where you will have to either admit or deny the charges against you.

What Should You Do With the NTA?

When you receive the NTA, you must review it carefully. Are there any mistakes on the NTA? Do you understand the allegations against you?

You must have a deep understanding of the NTA in order to apply for immigration relief. My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases. We can help you thoroughly understand the NTA and advise you on your deportation defense in immigration court.

Nature of Proceedings

Three types of different statements will appear on your NTA, but only one box will be checked off.

  1. You are an arriving alien.
  2. You are an alien present in the U.S., who has not been admitted or paroled.
  3. You have been admitted to the U.S., but are removable for the reasons stated below.

Are there any mistakes in the choice of the nature of proceedings? My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases and can help you seek waivers so you can remain in the United States.

Factual Allegations

The NTA will also describe the factual allegations against you. Let’s take a look at some possible allegations:

  1. You are not a U.S. citizen or a national of the United States;
  2. You are a native and citizen of your home country;
  3. You entered the U.S. but your entry was unauthorized;
  4. The alleged reason(s) describing the reasons you are removable.

Are there any mistakes in the factual allegations? My Orlando Immigration Lawyer serves Orlando and Central Florida cases and can help you avoid deportation so you can remain in the United States.

Let us help you fight this battle. We have over 18 years of legal experience in immigration court and can advise you on your immigration options to overcome deportation or removal proceedings.

Contact Orlando Immigration Lawyer Gail Seeram at the Law Offices of Gail Seeram at +1 (407) 292-7730 for a free initial consultation of your immigration case.

i551

Form I-551 is the official name of the United States Green Card or Alien Registration Card. A Green Card is used to prove that the holder has been admitted to and recognized as a legal permanent residence of the U.S. The I-551 can take the form of a temporary stamp in a valid passport or it may be a physical card.

I-551s can be valid for 2 years under conditional resident status or for 10 years under permanent resident status. Permanent I-551s lasting 10 years are also available to certain investors and immediate relatives.

Conditional Green Cards may also be issued. These cards are issued to foreign citizens who marry a U.S. citizen or to foreign investors and they do come with restrictions.

Benefits of a Green Card

Anyone holding a valid I-551 or Green Card has the right to live and work permanently in the United States. However, the Card does not make the holder a citizen of the U.S. Once a Green Card holder applies for U.S. citizenship he/she must give up their Green Card. After citizenship is granted, the person is considered a dual citizen so long as they hold passports for both the U.S. and their original country.

Deportation

A Green Card does not protect the holder from deportation. A holder who commits a serious crime or resides outside of the U.S. for too long will lose their I-551 privileges and benefits.

File Form I-551 With Help From Our Orlando Immigration Law Office

The Law Offices of Gail Seeram is an Orlando Immigration Law Office offering legal representation in all areas of U.S. immigration law, including Form I-551, Green Cards, and Residency.

Contact our Orlando immigration attorney at +1 (407) 292-7730 for assistance filing for or renewing Form I-551.

Free In-Office Initial Consultation

Don’t hire an immigration lawyer without a free consultation. A free consultation with an immigration lawyer should give you an opportunity to explain the facts of your case and the lawyer should provide a winnable step-by-step case strategy specific to your case. The Immigration Law Offices of Gail Seeram is your immigration lawyer free consultation.

Speak with an attorney with over 15 years of legal experience as immigration lawyers free consultation about your marriage based filing for permanent resident, family based filing for a parent, spouse, child or sibling, employer petition, investor visa, citizenship, waiver filing or deportation defense case.

Do you have an immigration problem, question or issue you would like to discuss with an immigration lawyers free consultation? The Immigration Law Offices of Gail S. Seeram offers a free in-office consultation to all clients – phone/web consultations are available for a nominal fee.

With the immigration lawyers free consultation, you will get all your questions answered and leave their office with a plan of action to solve your immigration issue.

Join a live on-line chat session at myorlandoimmigrationlawyer.com or call 1-877-GAIL-LAW and ask about an immigration lawyers free consultation at either the Orlando or Kissimmee offices.






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