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The Homeland Security Department announced on June 15, 2017 that it would keep in place the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, allowing undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the country.  In effect, Trump says Dreamers stay and has broken his key campaign promise to terminate DACA and immediately deport all illegal immigrants under the DACA program.  DACA recipients will continue to be eligible as outlined in the June 15, 2012, memorandum executed by President Obama.

In June 2012, President Obama announced that certain young people who were brought to the United States as young children, who do not present a risk to national security or public safety, and meet several key criteria will be considered for the relief of deferred action for two years and will be eligible for work authorization.  Under this directive, termed DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) individuals who demonstrate that they meet the following criteria will be eligible for deferred action, on a case-by-case basis AND can apply for work authorization in the U.S. if they meet the following criteria:

  1. Were under the age of 31 on June 15, 2012;
  2. Arrived in the United States before turning 16;
  3. Continuously resided in the United States from June 15, 2007, to the present;
  4. Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, as well as at the time of requesting deferred action from USCIS;
  5. Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or any lawful immigration status expired on or before June 15, 2012;
  6. On the date of the request, are in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED)

It is important to understand that deferred action is not a legal immigration status.  Deferred action is a discretionary decision by DHS (Department of Homeland Security) not to pursue enforcement against a person for a specific period. A grant of deferred action does not alter an individual’s existing immigration status or provide a path to citizenship.  Thus, deferred action cannot be used to establish eligibility for an immigration status that requires maintenance of lawful status. Deferred action, however, may allow a person to qualify for certain state benefits, such as driver license, though state requirements vary.

While deferred action does not cure any prior or subsequent period of unlawful presence, time in deferred action status is considered a period of stay authorized by the Secretary of DHS. An individual does not accrue unlawful presence while in deferred action status or while a DACA request is pending if the individual filed a request before reaching age 18. DHS can renew or terminate a grant of deferred action at any time.

For more information, contact Gail Law Firm:

Email: Gail@GailLaw.com

Phone: 1-877-GAIL-LAW or 407-292-7730

www.MyOrlandoImmigrationLawyer.com

FREE in-office consultation – FREE Live Chat

 

Copyright © Law Offices of Gail S. Seeram, 2017. All Rights Reserved.

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